Did you know that only about 2.5% of GWP customers have rooftop solar?
Statewide the number is closer to 10%.

Glendale has a huge amount of untapped local solar potential!

We can be a leader in local clean energy by going beyond 10% and adding battery storage alongside new and existing solar, as well as taking additional steps to manage energy demand.

GWP wants to install new gas-burning equipment in Glendale, at both the Grayson Power Plant and the Scholl Canyon Landfill. These projects would add to local air pollution, impact the climate, and hurt our community’s and children’s health.

Solar-based energy is a better solution. Glendale needs clean, renewable energy for a sustainable future. It’s time to embrace this clean energy vision. Clean, renewable energy will make Glendale a healthier, greener place to live, help fight climate change, and lower energy costs for us all.

GEC has a proposal for a suite of policies to make this vision a reality, including:

 new incentives
 new rebates
 streamlining and simplifying the process of installing solar and battery storage

Incentives and related policies are smart, and they work! The Million Solar Roofs initiative propelled California from 20,000 solar installations to over one million in 13 years, through rebates that transformed the market. Today, Hawaiian Electric is moving aggressively to get more customers to install batteries, by offering upfront cash incentives and monthly bill credits for 10 years, in exchange for customers charging their batteries from solar during the day and then discharging them in the evening.

 

Policies like these are key:

 Glendale should bring back solar incentives. Glendale used to have incentives that would pay a portion of the upfront cost of installing solar, but the City discontinued those incentives. They should be brought back and increased.

 Glendale should add new incentives for battery storage. Both upfront incentives and ongoing payments for people who use their batteries in ways that help the grid are important elements.

 Glendale should streamline the processes for GWP application review, building permits, and inspections, to reduce costs and speed up installations.

 There should be specific policies and higher incentives for lower-income customers and people living in the most polluted areas.

 There should also be specific policies designed to accelerate adoption of solar and storage at multifamily properties and rental properties.

 Glendale should create robust incentives and outreach programs for energy efficiency to reduce overall demand, and for demand response and load-shifting programs to reduce demand during peak hours.

 Glendale should continue its current net metering policy, which allows solar owners to receive bill credits for the excess solar energy produced by their panels and sent to the grid.

Sign on now, and we’ll share your support with City Council and add you to our list of supporters on this webpage. Showing your support will help us keep these goals at the TOP of Glendale’s agenda!

We support GEC’s Glendale Solar Solution! Glendale should work toward a goal of bringing residential and commercial rooftop solar and battery systems above 10% of customers. It should add local clean energy and reduce and manage energy demand, in place of adding new gas-burning power equipment. We call on the City to build a sustainable and reliable energy system for the health of our community today and for the future.

  • What will be included on the GEC website?

    Thank you for allowing us to list you on our website as a supporter of GEC’s Glendale Solar Solution. We will list your name, your city of residence, and, if you choose to include it, your neighborhood, if you work in Glendale, and any title and organizational affiliation you choose to include. We won’t share your email address, and will use it only to keep you updated about our campaign. Please contact us at contact@gec.eco if you have any questions.

If you would like to sign on your organization, please fill out the form and then email your logo to contact@gec.eco. You can sign on your organization, and you can sign on as an individual too. Simply let us know how you would like to be included by making a comment in the comment field.

Add my name as a Glendale Solar Solution supporter!

We support GEC’s
Glendale Solar Solution

GLENDALE RANCHO NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION

Alek Bartrosouf, Glendale Sustainability Commissioner
Todd Leonard, Senior Pastor, Glendale City Church
Manuel Magpapian, Southern California Armenian Democrats
Desirée Portillo Rabinov, GCC Board of Trustee, Glendale
Joan Hardie, Glendale
Marla Nelson, Co-founder Coalition for Scholl Landfill Alternatives
Roberta Medford, Montrose Peace Vigil (Vigil co-founder), Glendale (Montrose)
Arlene Vidor, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Catherine Jurca, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Joanne Hedge, Founder, Glendale Rancho Neighborhood Association
Jennifer Pinkerton, Glendale Sustainability Commissioner
Arno Aghamalian, President & CEO, Solar Optimum (Glendale)
Ingrid Gunnell, Glendale Unified School District Board Member, Area B
Stephen Meek, Adams Hill Neighborhood Association
Regina Joy Alcazar, Glendale Parks, Recreation & Community Services Commissioner
Juliet Minassian, 1st Vice President GDC and Vice Chair CAAD
Rick Stern, Verdugo Woodlands West HOA Board Member
Mike Borisov, Ex Officio Student Commissioner, Glendale Sustainability Commission
Yuzuna Kudo, Ex Officio Student Commissioner, Glendale Sustainability Commission
Emily Mirzakhan, President of GCC Students for Sustainability club
Kate Unger, Glendale (Pelanconi)
Paul Berolzheimer, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Joanna Pringle, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Xochitl Ruiz, Glendale
Cole Bazemore, Glendale (Citrus Grove)
Jackie Gish, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Elise Kalfayan, Glendale (Northwest)
David Eisenberg, Glendale
David Dowell, Glendale
Evan Simoni, Glendale
Amy Yazzetta, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Molly Gorbel, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Felipe Escobar, Glendale (Rancho Riverside)
Jamie Gambell, Glendale (Woodbury)
Victoria Kaplan, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
John Ballon, Co-Owner, Two Enlighten, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Anthony DeJoria, Glendale (Moorepark)
David Dennick, Glendale (Glenwood South)
Dragutin Ilich, Glendale
Carol Holst, Glendale
Richard Bennett, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Diana Fishman, Glendale (Glenwood)
Dr. Sonal Patel, Glendale (Emerald Isle)
Marie Freeman, Glendale
Terry Cisco, CAED, Glendale (Scholl Canyon)
Melanie McKinnell, Glendale (Sparr Heights)
Charlie Campagna, Glendale (Riverside Rancho)
Meredith Pominville, Co-leader/ Civic Sundays
Cherie Shore, Civic Sundays
Diane Hong, Glendale
Mark Corden, Glendale (La Crescenta)
Sarah Etemadi, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Donielle Lemone-Bulmer, Glendale (Woodbury)
Kathleen Hartley, Glendale (Chevy Chase)
Justin King, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Joann Lo, Glendale (La Crescenta)
Michael Reed, Associate Professor, Glendale Community College
Karen Lowe, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Stephanie Schus, Glendale
Tammy O’Connor, Glendale (Northwest)
Loretta DeLange, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands West)
Jeremy Aluma, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Debra Thompson, Glendale (Northwest)
Jessica Tardieu Haines, Glendale
Pamela Elyea, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Rachel Yoo, Glendale
Lisa Yeghiayan, Glendale
Nat Yonce, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Erik Hovland, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Diana Matsushima, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Erin Caswell, 3D Modeler at DreamWorks Animation, Glendale (Citrus Grove)
Vanessa Bulkacz, Glendale
Rana Strauss, Glendale
Annie Dove, Glendale
Effie Block, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Calder Block, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Emily Kumai, Glendale
Joemy Wilson, Glendale (Glenwood)
Carolina Loren, Glendale
Michele Morales, Glendale
Ray Riley, Glendale (Sparr Heights)
Ramona Barrio, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Margaret Mortimore, Glendale
Liz Barkhordarian, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Michael Gordon, Glendale
Jamie Fraser, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Amy Koss, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Mike Yeghiayan, Glendale
Kathy Jones, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Susanne Birman, Glendale (Chevy Chase Canyon)
Dora Herrera, Glendale
Traci Yee, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Dan Kruse, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Laura Minasian, Glendale
Banafsheh Sultan, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Jack Walworth, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Monica Campagna, Glendale (Riverside Rancho)
Paul  Rabinov, La Crescenta-Montrose
Erin Dinan, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Patrick Dinan, President, Impact Fiduciary LLC, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Rachel Ridgway, Instructor of Oceanography & Geology, Glendale Community College
Ben Ipekjian, Glendale (Northwest)
John Charles Meyer, Glendale (Montecito Park)
Melissa King, Glendale (Verdugo Viejo)
Garo Gobikyan, Glendale
Elizabeth Vitanza, Co-Owner, Two Enlighten, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Diana Matsushima, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Janet Jung, Glendale
Brian Newlin, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Paul Farmanian, Glendale (Verdugo Highlands)
Cybelle Jacobs, Glendale (Kenneth Village)
Brian McEvoy, IT Project Manager, San Gabriel Valley Water Company, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Tim Schumacher, Glendale
Joan Zierhut, Glendale
Litty Mathew, Glendale
Karen Berger, Glendale (Montrose)
Jessica Palacios, Glendale
Dr. José Luis Benavides, Glendale
Raziq Rauf, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Seth Anicich, glendaleOUT, Glendale (Downtown)
Jon Hamkins, Glendale
Burt Culver, Glendale
Nathan Cole, Glendale
Karen Kwak, Glendale (Tropico)
Sharon Landin, Glendale
Glenn Webb, Glendale (Royal Canyon)
Paul Manchester, Glendale
Dan Kruse, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Valerie Staveley, Glendale (Sycamore Woods)
Adrineh Audry Zarokian, Coalition for Scholl Landfill Alternatives
Maria del Sol Crocker, Glendale
Jeanette Stirdivant, Glendale (Oakmont)
Grey James, Glendale (Downtown)
Thomas Metzler, Glendale (South Glendale)
Patricia Pei, Glendale
Karen Berger, Glendale (Montrose)
Chris Lowery, President- Accurate Energy, Glendale (Cumberland Heights)
Charly Charney Cohen, Glendale
Marcia Hanford, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Christin Holden, La Crescenta-Montrose
Mike Allen, Glendale
Kourtney Smith, Glendale
Natalia Staunton, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Nathan Bulmer, Glendale
Marianna Rasamoela, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Jackie Eco, Glendale (Central)
Rachel Pringle, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Karen Hare Neilsson, Glendale (Riverside Rancho)
Christina Kousakis, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
David Block, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Joanna Saporito, Glendale (Rossmoyne)
Joanna Hess, Glendale (Verdugo Woodlands)
Dennis Nguyen, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Erika Robbins, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Nancy MacLeod, Glendale (Adams Hill)
Laura Kirakosian, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Rebecca Addelman, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Roberto Maltez, Glendale (Tropico)
Christopher Chorebanian, Glendale
Laura Nelson, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Clara Gharibian, Glendale
Susan Dasso, Glendale (North Cumberland Heights Historic District)
Cindy Gonzalez, Glendale
April Gustafsen, Glendale
Renee Holt, Glendale (Glenoaks Canyon)
Bill Weisman, Glendale (Crescenta Highlands)
William Jay, Glendale (Grand Central)
Monica Ross, Glendale (Adams Hill)

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the Glendale Solar Solution? It’s a policy proposal, a campaign for public support, and a vision for Glendale’s future. GEC has developed the Glendale Solar Solution to involve all Glendalians in the solution for our energy needs, especially during peak demand hours.

What policies are included in the Glendale Solar Solution? The proposal includes policies that will make it less expensive, easier, and faster to install solar and storage at your home or business. There are many smart policies Glendale could adopt. The City should explore all of these and develop a plan that works for Glendale.

  • Upfront incentives or rebates on solar installations, at a level that will allow customers to recoup the cost of investing in a solar system quickly and make the investment a smart financial choice.
  • The highest level of incentives in 2022-2025 so that we can supercharge solar installations right away.
  • Both upfront rebates and ongoing performance-based incentives for battery storage installed with solar systems.
  • Higher incentives and other policies specifically aimed to encourage solar and storage adoption by lower-income customers and customers who live in the most heavily polluted areas of Glendale.
  • Specific policies designed to accelerate adoption of solar and storage at multifamily properties and rental properties, such as virtual net metering (an arrangement that enables a property with separate utility accounts to have solar credits allocated to all the accounts), upfront incentives, and more policies to make solar and storage attractive to both owners and tenants.
  • Keep the current net metering policy for solar, which gives the customer a credit for energy sent from their solar system to the grid that’s equal to the cost of energy the customer uses from the grid.
  • Allow people to install solar systems sized larger than current usage, to meet future energy needs as they add electric vehicles and appliances.
  • A revised feed-in tariff program for customers to sell electricity to GWP at rates that are financially beneficial for both the customer and the utility.
  • Streamlined processes for GWP application review, building permit approval, and inspections, to reduce costs and speed up installations.
  • Outreach and technical assistance to encourage customers participation and help them through the process.

How can the Glendale Solar Solution be put into practice? We are looking to Glendale City Council, our City’s leaders, to pass a resolution adopting the goals of the Glendale Solar Solution, and putting in place a plan to get us there. Mayor Ardy Kassakhian introduced the resolution on July 12, 2022. The resolution could come up for a vote as early as August.

Doesn’t Glendale already have solar incentives? Glendale used to offer incentives for solar systems. Originally, the amount was fairly high, but the budget didn’t cover demand, so only some people received the incentive, through a random lottery system. Later, the amount was reduced. On June 30, 2021 the city discontinued all solar incentives.

How do performance-based incentives for batteries work? Customers agree to let GWP or a battery company manage their battery in a way that helps Glendale’s grid, especially when usage spikes on hot evenings. In return, customers get bill credits or cash payments.

What can Glendale residents do to support the Glendale Solar Solution? The best thing you can do is sign on as a supporter! You can do that right here on this website. Showing that the Glendale community stands behind this proposal is key. You can also support the Glendale Solar Solution by joining GEC. You can email and call in to CIty Council to express your support. You can volunteer to help in other ways, too. If you’d like to talk about possible things you can do to help, please email us at contact@gec.eco.

Why is Glendale so far behind the state in solar installations? As you might imagine, there’s no single reason. One major reason is that the state embraced a bold policy vision in 2006, when Governor Schwarzenegger signed the Million Solar Roofs initiative, Senate Bill 1, into law. This was a $3.3 billion investment in the state’s solar future, designed to lower the cost of solar energy and enable widespread adoption, with a goal of 3,000 megawatts of rooftop solar. California met the one million solar roofs milestone in 2019. The Million Solar Roofs initiative was most successful in the investor-owned utilities’ territories, and less so in the territories of municipal utilities like Glendale, including because of a lack of transparency and regular reporting of market data to monitor performance. Also, Glendale has a higher proportion of multifamily homes than the state as a whole, and it’s not as easy to install solar on multifamily buildings. Another factor is that Glendale’s electric utility rates have historically not been as high as rates charged by investor-owned utilities. Higher electric rates means higher costs for energy purchased from the utility, and greater savings from using self-generated solar energy instead. That increases the financial incentives for going solar by making it take less time to recoup an investment in a solar system. The Glendale Solar Solution would provide incentives at a level to make adopting solar make good financial sense, by substantially reducing the cost of a system and making the significant monthly bill savings meet and beat the initial investment much faster than it takes in Glendale now.

How would replacing the Grayson and Scholl Canyon power plant plans with a solar and storage plan affect our energy reliability? Energy storage is one of the fastest, most responsive energy resources available. The Glendale Solar Solution includes a strong energy storage component, by providing incentives to customers who install batteries paired with storage. GWP can also install more energy storage on its electrical system to capture solar energy produced by customers during the day. All the solar energy can be stored until it’s needed and then dispatched instantaneously. Studies have shown that energy storage can provide reliable, affordable energy. The Glendale Solar Solution is a vision for a clean, reliable, energy system. We all know the value of reliable energy service, and it will be an essential element of the plan.

Can GWP put more storage at Grayson or elsewhere to utilize the solar on commercial buildings and homes that don’t currently have battery storage? Yes, we think GWP should consider adding more energy storage in Glendale. GWP is planning to install 75 MW/300 MWh of storage at Grayson already. That battery system will be charged with renewable energy through transmission lines into Glendale. Additional battery storage could be added to charge from solar installed on customer properties throughout the city. Glendale’s distribution system may offer sites such as at substations, and there may be other sites that could be used for installing modular batteries throughout the city. The option of having GWP install more battery storage may be a good solution for Glendale, which we believe the city should explore.

How will the federal Inflation Reduction Act affect the Glendale Solar Solution? The federal climate bill, the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA), can make adding solar and energy storage more attractive and a smarter financial choice. There are two main considerations.

  • The IRA would increase the federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) to 30% for 10 years. The ITC will allow people and entities that install solar and storage to deduct 30% of the cost to install a system from their taxes, effectively reducing the installation cost by 30%. The Glendale Solar Solution includes asking the City to provide incentives to reduce the cost of installing a solar + storage system so that Glendale residents, businesses, and organizations can afford the investment. The ITC would reduce the cost, and incentives would go farther.
  • The IRA will also incentivize electrifying appliances—switching out gas-burning appliances like furnaces, water heaters, ranges, and clothes dryers—and electric vehicles. Making those changes will increase electricity usage, which means higher electricity bills—but if you have a solar system that you can use to generate electricity for all of those new appliances and EVs, then you won’t face higher electricity. You will also no longer be paying for gas for your car and home. If you replace gas appliances with electric appliances for the environmental benefits (and there are many!), the best way to make sure you’re using renewable energy as your electricity source is to generate it yourself, and use a battery to have that energy available when you need it. Increasing your use of electricity makes having solar and storage make even more financial and environmental sense than it already does!

GEC’s Glendale Solar Solution campaign will make Glendale a leader in local clean energy by meeting–and then beating–the statewide solar numbers.